Circe

Circe

eBook - 2018
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#1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER—NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY NPR, The Washington Post, People, Time, Amazon, Entertainment Weekly, Bustle, Newsweek, the A.V. Club, Christian Science Monitor and Refinery 29, Buzzfeed, Paste, Audible, Kirkus, Publishers Weekly, Thrillist, NYPL, Self Real Simple, Goodreads, Boston Globe, Electric Literature, BookPage, the Guardian, Book Riot, Seattle Times, and Business Insider
"A bold and subversive retelling of the goddess's story," this #1 New York Times bestseller is "both epic and intimate in its scope, recasting the most infamous female figure from the Odyssey as a hero in her own right" (Alexandra Alter, The New York Times).

In the house of Helios, god of the sun and mightiest of the Titans, a daughter is born. But Circe is a strange child—not powerful, like her father, nor viciously alluring like her mother. Turning to the world of mortals for companionship, she discovers that she does possess power—the power of witchcraft, which can transform rivals into monsters and menace the gods themselves.


Threatened, Zeus banishes her to a deserted island, where she hones her occult craft, tames wild beasts and crosses paths with many of the most famous figures in all of mythology, including the Minotaur, Daedalus and his doomed son Icarus, the murderous Medea, and, of course, wily Odysseus.
But there is danger, too, for a woman who stands alone, and Circe unwittingly draws the wrath of both men and gods, ultimately finding herself pitted against one of the most terrifying and vengeful of the Olympians. To protect what she loves most, Circe must summon all her strength and choose, once and for all, whether she belongs with the gods she is born from, or the mortals she has come to love.
With unforgettably vivid characters, mesmerizing language and page-turning suspense, Circe is a triumph of storytelling, an intoxicating epic of family rivalry, palace intrigue, love and loss, as well as a celebration of indomitable female strength in a man's world.

Publisher: Little, Brown and Company

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WPL_Erin Mar 04, 2021

I honestly don't think this novel was bad, it just wasn't for me. I had a really hard time connecting with Circe and while I was pulled in early on I really lost interest and felt I had to slog my way through the remainder. It just felt really slow plot wise and I just didn't vibe with it at all.

JCLCherylMY Feb 27, 2021

What a beautiful story based on Greek Mythology. The reader's voice was lyrical in her interpretation of Circe and the other characters. I will be haunted by Circe's voice for a long time: "I was not surprised by the portrait of myself, the proud witch undone before the hero's sword, kneeling and begging for mercy. Humbling women seems to me a chief pastime for poets. As if there can be no story unless we crawl and weep." Stunning!

r
RachelPusey
Feb 20, 2021

It lived up to the hype. Beguiling characters and crystalline use of language.

d
DracAthos
Feb 19, 2021

This book was thoroughly engaging and I was drawn to the page every day.
I loved how the author wove various myths through the story while keeping the narrative focused on Circe.
Her childhood was a horror story that only made her stronger and that more willing to adapt and to find better solutions.
I loved how she always found a better way and she was willing to listen even when she didn't want to.
I highly recommend this book to anyone who likes Greek mythology and anyone who wants a good story

m
marthadanielle
Feb 09, 2021

The book goes through different phases or her life since she is centuries old. The beginning half was filled with stories of people mistreating her and loneliness but the second half she grows in power and confidence and the end is satisfying.

r
Readerofhs
Jan 31, 2021

Compelling and interesting

i
IntrovertReader
Jan 27, 2021

Circe is the oldest child of the Greek god Helios and the sea nymph Perse. Everyone, including Circe herself, believes that she and her siblings lack divine power. She spends her childhood creeping around the edges of godly feasts and trying to avoid the torments that her younger brother and sister devise for her. When her mother gives birth to another son, Circe bonds with him. Aeëtes eventually leads her to believe that maybe they aren’t quite as helpless as they appear. When Circe accomplishes a couple of dramatic transformations via magic, the other gods realize she and her siblings are witches. Circe bears the brunt of the gods’ punishment and they exile her to the island of Aiaia for all eternity.

I’ve read so many glowing reviews of this book but copies are never available at my library. I finally bought my own book to see what all the fuss is about and I’m so glad I did.

Circe is every woman who has been treated as “less than” because of her gender. As a child, she accepts that everyone overlooks her. She’s not as beautiful as the other nymphs, so why would anyone pay attention to her? She’s starved for attention though, and makes some terrible decisions. But those decisions lead her to discover that she has magic. Her exile gives her room to discover more about her powers and hone them. Watching her grow into her divinity and carve her own space in the world felt empowering to me.

But Circe also has more heart than other gods. Mortals fascinate her, even as a child. When some try to worship her, she rejects their adoration. While other gods view mortals as play things or simply don’t really notice them at all, she’s eager to learn more about their world and how their minds work. In addition, other gods never even realize that they’re capable of making mistakes. Circe not only acknowledges her errors but tries to make amends. A static life seems boring, but growing and changing and trying to improve? That’s the life Circe lives.

I also enjoyed reading about Greek heroes as regular people. Sure, they’re wilier and and stronger than most but at the end of the day, they’re just humans. Daedalus’s suffering began long before he tried to fly. Odysseus is impatient and quick-tempered and regrets some of his decisions in the war, although he would repeat them if he had to. I liked seeing them on a mortal scale.

I highly recommend this. In some ways, it’s a fairly quiet book; but I found Circe’s transformation from an unassuming girl to a powerful force both engrossing and satisfying.

l
lozza1401
Jan 13, 2021

I read this after finishing reading the three of Stephen Fry's books on Greek mythology, heroes and the Trojan War. I loved this book for a more personal view on Greek mythology from a female perspective. Highly recommended!

j
jenwan914
Jan 10, 2021

A poignant tale of love, eternal punishment, self discovery, and the human condition, Madeline Miller's Circe was a book I couldn't put down. Circe, the daughter of a naiad and the sun god Helios, is an outcast in her family of shining gods. Despite being a powerful sorceress herself, her powers are feared and eventually leads to her exile on the island of Aiaia, where must live for the rest of eternity. She develops her magic on the island, learning how to push the boundaries of her own strength-- but the life of a goddess is never that simple, and her unfortunate past always seems to be knocking at her door, despite her being exiled for all of time. Thousands of years pass, but Circe's constant visitors ensure that she is never really alone.

Miller's work is beautiful and heart wrenching, with each sentence filled with descriptive and figurative language. I loved Circe's character development throughout the book and how Miller shifts the narrative of Odysseus' story to focus on Circe, a self-possessed and wise female character. I enjoyed reading about Circe's interactions with the other characters, such as her sister Pasiphae and the messenger god Hermes. The ending of the book seemed a little rushed, and there wasn't much time to absorb all of the events that were being thrown at the reading. The book's closing felt very fast-paced, with so many major scenes taking place and so little time to process it. Circe's new-found love, her freedom, and the departure of her loved ones all occurred within the last few chapters of the book. I would have liked it if the events of the book moved slower. Other than that, I loved the book and will definitely read it again. The book was absolutely wonderful and I give it a 5/5 star rating!

Bunny_Watson716 Jan 08, 2021

I could not put this book down. I love the retelling of Circe's story, and the author's skill at bringing an imaginary ancient world to life was incredible. If you are looking for a book to help take your mind off the state of the world, give this book a try. If you love strong descriptive language and vivid characters, and are a fan of Greek mythology -or feel like you have not read enough in that area, you might enjoy this book too.

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Quotes

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ArapahoeTina Nov 03, 2019

Humbling women seems to me a chief pastime of poets. As if there can be no story unless we crawl and weep.

ArapahoeTina Nov 03, 2019

He showed me his scars, and in return he Let me pretend that I had none.

a
ambdizzle
Sep 26, 2019

But most of all my father’s voice, speaking those words like trash he dropped. Such as you. Any other day in all my years of life I would have curled upon myself and wept. But that day his scorn was like a spark falling on dry tinder.

t
tamun
Sep 06, 2019

“Witches are not so delicate.”

t
tamun
Sep 06, 2019

“You have always been the worst of my children,” he said. “Be sure to not dishonor me.”
“I have a better idea. I will do as I please, and when you count your children, leave me out.”

t
tamun
Sep 06, 2019

“Humbling women seems to me a chief pastime of poets. As if there can be no story unless we crawl and weep.”

t
tamun
Sep 06, 2019

“But in a solitary life, there are rare moments when another soul dips near yours, as stars once a year brush the earth. Such a constellation was he to me.”

m
m0mmyl00
Aug 12, 2019

Pg. 273 of the hardcover, “It is youth’s gift not to feel its debts.”
Pg. 311 of the hardcover, “But perhaps no parent can truly see their child. When we look we see only the mirror of our own faults.”

q
queensthief
Feb 12, 2019

But perhaps no parent can truly see their child. When we look we see only the mirror of our own faults.

j
jimg2000
Jan 26, 2019

WHEN I WAS BORN, the name for what I was did not exist. They called me nymph, assuming I would be like my mother and aunts and thousand cousins. Least of the lesser goddesses, our powers were so modest they could scarcely ensure our eternities. We spoke to fish and nurtured flowers, coaxed drops from the clouds or salt from the waves. That word, nymph, paced out the length and breadth of our futures. In our language, it means not just goddess, but bride.
===
See her arrange her dress so it drapes just so over her shoulders. I see her dab her fingers, glinting, in the water. I have seen her do a thousand such tricks a thousand times. My father always fell for them. He believed the world’s natural order was to please him.
===

Once when I was young I asked what mortals looked like. My father said, “You may say they are shaped like us, but only as the worm is shaped like the whale.” My mother had been simpler: like savage bags of rotten flesh.

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ArapahoeTina Feb 07, 2020

ArapahoeTina thinks this title is suitable for 15 years and over

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muchai
May 20, 2019

muchai thinks this title is suitable for 12 years and over

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mperian1150
Oct 26, 2019

Other: Sexual assault

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